Review: The Grand Tour’s great, but can a bit more go wrong, please?

The Grand Tour is off to a great start but there’s something missing — a healthy heap of calamity.

Advertisements

If there’s one thing The Grand Tour had going for it on its release, it was that it was always going to be compared with the new incarnation of Top Gear, and seeing how that was utter shite, Jeremy Clarkson’s newest venture was always going to come out favourably.

However, now the dust has settled and the image of Chris Evans’ ginger bonce nodding up and down excitedly as he bellows to camera about what you could expect in the next VT has faded, we can appreciate The Grand Tour for what it really is — faults and all.

While it may have been labelled “Top Gear on steroids” there seems to be a slight departure from the type of programming that made the trio of Clarkson, Hammond and May so unique and so likable. Sure, there’s lots of cars going very fast. Granted, there’s plenty of banter between the three. Yes, there’s a new track and a (semi) tamed racing driver.

But there’s one thing it’s been strangely lacking thus far. A colossal dosage of calamity. That was where the three really came to life: when they were attempting to build amphibious cars and drive them across the Channel; or when they chauffeured celebrities to the BAFTAs in self-made limousines; or that time they raced across Florida and annoyed just about everybody.

Yes, larking about in extremely fast cars is all well and good, but there’s only so many times you can watch three middle-aged men hurtle through pristine scenery in a car worth more than your house.

Perhaps it is something to do with the enormous budget gifted to them by Amazon. But sometimes it’s just terrific viewing to watch them tanking around some unremarkable part of the world in three crap cars, while everything goes wrong, Jeremy shouts, James gets annoyed and Richard crashes into things.

Thus far, and admittedly the series has only just begun, there’s not been enough of that utter stupidity and the impending feeling that everything is about to go absolutely tits up. That’s where the real funniness manifests.

The show is hardly a failure: the Celebrity Brain Crash section of the show is great, the camaraderie between the three is as strong as it ever was and visually the whole thing looks impeccable, but it’d be great to see the presenters in a less artificial setting, where there are no scripts to work off and the humour develops naturally, with as little cajoling as possible.

But there are signs it’s coming. The show touched upon this with the Jordan section – albeit that segment  was appalling and suffered from far too many planned events – and the montage from the first episode did show James May traversing a river in some godforsaken contraption that was rapidly falling apart.

A lot of people want the Top Gear of old back; and others want something bigger, more explosive and more expensive than that. Really, all it needs is a few more things going wrong.